Capture the Imagination

Video

I recently dusted off my film scoring hat for this fun short by Dan Jobson.

Holed up in his forest tree house, a hunter sets a trap for an elusive creature. The time would pass much quicker if he could just finish the story he is writing…

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Listening Art video documentation

Events, Video

The videos below document the works shown in the Listening Art exhibition in February 2015. The videos, and accompanying binaural audio, labelled “1st person POV” are intended to simulate the process of experiencing the works from a visitor’s point-of-view. They are best viewed/listened to wearing headphones. Those labelled “3rd person perspective” show the process of experiencing the works from an external point-of-view; in these, my supervisor Dr Roger Alsop plays the part of a visitor to the exhibition.

Also, below the videos from the exhibition are POV videos of the draft versions of the works, as shown to research participants as part of my PhD project.

Memory Walk

Video

This is Memory Walk, a video/audio piece I’m working on as part of my PhD project Listening Music, presented at the Australasian Computer Music Conference earlier this year. It’s one of a set of sound art works that aim to encourage the listener to listen self-critically. Memory Walk aims to foreground the relationship between perception, memory, and imagination of the future.

I posted this a while back on Vimeo but there’s been playback problems from there for some reason. So here it is on YouTube.

Memory walk

Video

This is Memory Walk, a video/audio piece I’m working on as part of my PhD project Listening Music, presented at the Australasian Computer Music Conference last week (9/7/2014). It’s one of a set of sound art works that aim to encourage the listener to listen self-critically. Memory Walk aims to foreground the relationship between perception, memory, and imagination of the future.

Listening Skin (draft)

Video

This is a draft version of an idea I’m working on for a sound/video/performance piece.

In it I use a set of binaural microphones, and my body, as an instrument. I use the microphones backwards (i.e. facing into my ears as opposed to out of them), exploring the sounds of me touching my head as heard internally, and later in the piece the microphones become directly implicated as an instrument of sound production as I use them on the surface of my head/ears/face to make sounds.

This piece is sort of intended as a critique of the idea of binaural recording, a fascinating but flawed technology, and stereo imaging in general, both being ultimately one dimensional and only concerned with the ears, and not with the body’s other means of experiencing vibration.

Ideally I’d like this to be a live performance piece however I’m kind of terrified of the potential for these mics to produce feedback, having not yet had an opportunity to test them out with a PA system. For the moment it seem to work pretty well as video.

Apologies for my face! I’m not an actor or a model and there’s nothing staged about what my face is doing, although maybe there should be. That’s just how my face looks when I’m making sounds/playing instruments/composing.